2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, granting most women the constitutional right to vote. The women who fought for this right were ridiculed, fined, jailed and beaten. Following their victory a century ago, the battle continued to secure voting rights for all citizens. When you exercise your right to vote, you honor their courage and persistence, and carry on their legacy by making your voice heard.

 


Supporters of women's suffrage look on as Governor Frazier signs 1917 North Dakota suffrage legislation.


 

1848: SENECA FALLS, NEW YORK
In July, this gathering of 300 men and women produced the Declaration of Sentiments, which launched the women’s suffrage movement: “Now, in view of this entire disfranchisement of one-half the people of this country... we insist that they have immediate admission to all the rights and privileges which belong to them as citizens of these United States.” The fight would continue for 72 years.

 

1919: NORTH DAKOTA RATIFICATION
North Dakota becomes the 20th state to ratify the 19th Amendment. A total of 36 states are needed for the amendment to be enacted.

 

1920: 19TH AMENDMENT
On August 18, Tennessee becomes the 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment. "The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” But not all Native American or Asian women have citizenship, and barriers to voting remained for many African-American citizens.

 

1924: THE INDIAN CITIZENSHIP ACT 
"BE IT ENACTED... That all non citizen Indians born within the territorial limits of the United States be, and they are hereby, declared to be citizens of the United States.

 

1952: MCCARRAN WALTER ACT 
This act extends citizenship and voting rights to Asian-Americans.

 

1971: VOTING AGE
The voting age is lowered from 21 to 18.

 

 

You are eligible to vote in North Dakota if you are:

  • A citizen of the United States who is 18 or older on the day of election
  • A resident of ND who has resided in the precinct at least 30 days prior to the election
  • You can vote in person, by absentee ballot, or by mail

 

Voting at the Polling Place:

  • A valid North Dakota driver’s license or nondriver’s identification card
  • Tribal government issued identification (including those issued by BIA for a tribe located in North Dakota, any other tribal agency or entity, or any other tribal document that sets forth the tribal member's name, date of birth, and current North Dakota residential address)
  • Long term care identification certificate (provided by North Dakota facility)
     

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Voting Resources:

League of Women Voters of ND
www.lwvnd.org

 

ND Native Vote
www.ndnativevote.org

 

ND Secretary of State
www.vote.nd.gov

 


ND Women’s Network is proud to partner with the
ND Women's Suffrage Centennial Committee  (www.facebook.com/NDWSCC/)
and the Badass Grandmas (www.facebook.com/badassgrandmas/
on our 2020 Suffrage Centennial vote initiative.

This project was funded in part by a grant from Otto Bremer Trust.